San Francisco Giants: Seth Corry is the team’s most unheralded prospect

The San Francisco Giants have a few notable prospects receiving nationwide recognition. But left-handed pitcher Seth Corry continues to be overlooked.

The San Francisco Giants have done an exceptional job of rebuilding what was previously a barren farm system. But one prospect who continues to be overlooked in favor of others is pitcher Seth Corry.

At this time two years ago, the Giants had just two players in the MLB’s top-100 prospect rankings, that being catcher Joey Bart. Fast-forward just two years later and five Giants’ prospects now reside on that list.

The last of which is Seth Corry.

Of course, most will immediately recognize the likes of Joey Bart and Heliot Ramos who have been among baseball’s best prospects for years. Even the surging Marco Luciano is turning heads at just 18 years of age.

But Corry, well he barely snuck on to the list at No. 99.

Corry was originally drafted by the Giants in the third round of the 2017 MLB Draft out of Lone Peak High School in Highland, Utah. He would struggle in his first professional season finishing with a 5.55 ERA in 13 appearances (10 starts) while pitching in the Arizona League.

He would show progress in 2018 getting promoted from the Rookie League to Class-A Short Season by the end of the year. But his true breakout campaign would come this past season when he was promoted to Single-A Augusta.

Corry went on to make 27 appearances (26 starts) while finishing with a 1.76 ERA and 172 strikeouts in 122.2 innings pitched. He would be named the South Atlantic League Pitcher of the Year for his efforts officially putting his name on the map.

Now, going into 2020, there are already talks that he could be making an appearance in the big leagues come September. At just 21-years-old, Corry is one of the brightest young pitching prospects not only in the Giants organization, but in all of the MLB.

Here is a detailed analysis of what he has to offer courtesy of MLB Pipeline.

“Corry’s best offering is an upper-70s curveball with downer break and he often commands it better than his fastball. His heater sits in the low 90s and peaks at 96 mph with armside run. His changeup showed significant improvement in 2019, allowing him to keep right-handers in check and look more like a starter than a two-pitch reliever.”

That last sentence is especially crucial and what makes him the true top-100 prospect that he is. Corry doesn’t project as a late-inning, two-pitch reliever. He’s a bonafide starter with ace potential.

In reality, Corry is likely closer to the big leagues than most Giants fans realize. While a call-up this season does seem unlikely — especially with expanded rosters dropping to just 28 players — his time is coming and it shouldn’t be long before he cracks the major-league roster.

Expect to see Corry in Spring Training next year with an outside shot of seeing MLB action in 2020 if he continues to excel in the minors.

Next: San Francisco Giants: A complete fantasy baseball guide for 2020

And while everyone will be focused on the likes of Bart, Ramos, and Luciano, Corry is absolutely a player to keep an eye on.

Load Comments